City snapshots

The cities where we tested a new way to measure natural gas leaks are a cross-section of America’s urban geography. The maps underscore the persistent and widespread challenge of leaks. They also show the results when utilities and regulators dedicate resources to fix the problem. Beyond this pilot project, EDF hopes that utilities will publish their own maps to show where they have made repairs and where new leaks are found.

The project is still in demonstration mode, using a handful of specially-equipped Google Street View cars. In the coming months, look for maps from more cities. Follow this project to get updates.

Boston, MA

Boston’s aging infrastructure is prone to corrosion and leaks. Our readings indicate an average of about one leak for each mile we drove.
More about Boston and how to help »

Burlington, VT

Burlington is a smaller system built more recently than others in New England. Our readings indicate an average of about one leak for every 10 miles we drove.
More about Burlington and how to help »

Chicago, IL

Chicago’s partially updated system is still among the oldest in the country. Our readings indicate an average of about one leak for every three miles we drove.
More about Chicago and how to help »

Dallas, TX

Dallas is working to eliminate all cast iron in its system by 2021. In the areas surveyed we found one leak for every two miles we drove.
More about the Dallas area and how to help »

Indianapolis, IN

Of the cities we’ve mapped so far, Indianapolis has the lowest number of leaks per mile driven. Our readings indicate an average of about one leak for every 200 miles we drove.
Why Indianapolis has fewer leaks »

Jacksonville, FL

Jacksonville has a lower percentage of corrosive and leak-prone pipes than most other cities we have mapped. In the areas surveyed we found one leak for every nine miles we drove.
More about the Jacksonville area and how to help »

Los Angeles Area, CA

We mapped four cities in the Los Angeles Area: Chino, Inglewood, Pasadena, and Orange. In the areas surveyed we found one leak for roughly every four to six miles we drove.
More about the Los Angeles Area and how to help »

Mesa, AZ

Our readings for the City of Mesa Municipal System indicated an average of about one leak for every 60 miles we drove.
More about the Mesa area and how to help »

New
Pittsburgh, PA

Our readings indicated an average of about one leak for every two miles we drove within the study area.
More about Pittsburgh and how to help »

Staten Island, NY

New York City has an older infrastructure that includes corrosion-prone cast iron pipes. Our readings indicate an average of about one leak for each mile we drove.
More about Staten Island and how to help »

Syracuse, NY

More than half of Syracuse’s pipes are more than 50 years old. Our readings indicate an average of about one leak for every two miles we drove.
More about Syracuse and how to help »

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