Mercury and Air Toxics Standards

EPA's Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, finalized in 2011, placed the first-ever national limits on the amount of mercury, acid gases, and other toxic pollution that power plants can emit. Coal-fired power plants were the largest source of these pollutants before Mercury and Air Toxics Standards went into effect.

The Mercury and Air Toxics Standards will save up to 11,000 lives each year and protect our families and communities from toxic pollution's harmful effects on our air, food and water.

Support for the rule

Support for these standards is widespread and diverse. EPA received more than 900,000 public comments in support of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards.

States, mayors, industry and labor groups, public health groups and medical associations, environmental groups, faith groups, small business groups, the NAACP, moms, scientists, sportsmen, and Voces Verdes have all spoken up in support of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards.

What's next?

Although the power sector is already meeting these crucial standards, the Trump Administration and a few coal barons are working to undermine them.

In October 2018, the Trump administration officially confirmed it is reviewing a proposal to reconsider the foundation of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards.

Opponents are also suing over aspects of the standards. EDF will continue to fight on all fronts for these life-saving standards.

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