Dallas: Snapshot of natural gas leaks

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City snapshot

  • How many leaks: Our readings indicated an average of about one leak for every two miles we drove within the study area.
  • Utility: The Dallas area is serviced by Atmos Energy Mid-Tex Division.
  • Pipe materials: About 13% of mains operated by Atmos Energy Mid-Tex Division are made from cast iron or other leak-prone material.
  • Age of pipes: About 50% of the mains are more than 50 years old.
  • Dates mapped: Cars with air sensors took readings in the survey areas from January 2015 through February 2016. This map represents a snapshot in time and may not reflect current leaks due to repairs or other changes.
  • Progress: As part of a comprehensive pipe replacement program, Atmos Energy Mid-Tex Division is on schedule to eliminate all known cast iron in its system by 2021.

Explore Dallas map

Most leaks don’t pose an immediate threat to safety or health, but some can. We have shared all data with Atmos Energy Mid-Tex Division, including any incidentally recorded leak points observed outside designated drive areas shown on the map.

If you ever smell gas, or have any reason to suspect a problem, experts say to immediately exit the building or area, then call the authorities. For more see the Atmos Energy safety page.

More about why leaks are a problem »

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Live in Texas? Ask officials to address leaks

Texas has an opportunity to better address methane leaks. Tell the Railroad Commission of Texas and Dallas City Council that this matters to you.

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If you don’t live in Texas, find out how you can help.