Securing abundant water supplies

EDF is pioneering ways to keep rivers flowing in the era of climate change

Use of Colorado River water already exceeds the average supply, so we must broker new ways to share water in the West.

Alan English/Flickr

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Climate change, drought and growing populations are taking their toll on Western rivers and watersheds. That's why we're working with farmers, cities and other environmental groups to develop market solutions and other incentives that conserve water and preserve rivers.

Our current strategies

  • Jennifer Pitt

    Finding flexible solutions to water scarcity

    EDF experts like Jennifer Pitt are transforming the way water is used in the Colorado River Basin by pushing for flexible systems like irrigation efficiency and water banking instead of the outdated "use it or lose it" method. 
  • Cinega

    Using science to find the best steps to restoration

    In 2014, EDF, our partners and the governments of the U.S and Mexico planned and launched a historic "pulse flow" of water that was designed to mimic, at a reduced scale, the kind of periodic floods that inundated the Colorado River Delta for eons. We're investigating the success of the pulse flow to plan a path forward to restoration.
  • Swainsons Hawk on Branch

    Restoring vital riverside habitat with unlikely partners

    Vast swaths of riverside habitat in California's Central Valley have been lost, threatening species like the Swainson's Hawk and Chinook salmon. Because most of the land in this region is privately held, we're reaching out to ranchers and farmers to help them get paid for restoring or maintaining habitat as part of the Central Valley Habitat Exchange.