Staten Island: Snapshot of natural gas leaks

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City snapshot

  • How many leaks: Our readings indicated an average of about one leak for every mile we drove.
  • Utility: National Grid
  • Pipe materials: More than one quarter of the pipes in National Grid’s New York service territory are made from cast iron or other corrosion- and leak-prone materials.
  • Age of pipes: More than half of the pipes are more than 50 years old, which is common in older Northeastern cities.
  • What's notable: Landfills emit methane, and Staten Island holds the largest landfill on the Eastern Seaboard. This analysis accounts for high background methane near the landfill, and so could miss small leaks.
  • Dates mapped: Cars with air sensors took readings between January and April 2014. This map might not represent current leaks, due to repairs or other changes.

Explore Staten Island map

Most leaks don't pose an immediate threat to safety or health, but some can. We have shared this data with National Grid.

If you ever smell gas, or have any reason to suspect a problem, experts say to immediately exit the building or area, then call the authorities. For information specific to National Grid, see their safety page.

More about why leaks are a problem »

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Live in New York State? Ask state officials to address leaks

Not enough resources are being provided for repairs, so leaks can continue for months, and often years. Tell the head of the state's public utility commission that this matters to you.

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If you don’t live in New York, find out how you can help.