Does the future of the Amazon rainforest lie in California?

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From left to right: Lubenay, Juan Carlos, Derek Walker and Megaron Txucarramae (a leader of Brazil’s indigenous Kayapo tribe)

This post was co-authored by Steve Schwartzman, EDF's director of tropical forest policy.

Over the past year, California’s new carbon market has held five auctions, generating $530 million for projects that reduce climate pollution in the state. This is just the start, however, as we believe the program has potential to achieve substantial environmental benefits half a world away in the Amazon rainforest.

We are working with community partners, scientific and business leaders, and California policy makers to craft a rule that permits credits from REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation) to be used in California’s carbon market, rewarding indigenous and forest-dwelling communities with incentives for ecosystem protection.

California is leading the way

Using California’s new carbon market to reward rainforest protection would be a powerful signal to Brazil, Mexico, and other tropical countries—and to the world—that leaving forests standing is more profitable than cutting them down.

With the right rules in place, California could create an international gold standard for REDD credits that could be adopted by emerging carbon markets in China, Mexico and beyond.

The right technology

There’s a misperception about how hard it is to measure whether forests are being destroyed or protected. Current technology makes it possible, right now. Satellite and airplane-based sensors are already capable of recording what’s going on with high accuracy. This technology enables us to measure emissions reductions across whole states or countries, the best way to ensure that the reductions are real.

The right partners

We need to help pull together the best policy experts, scientists, and environmental organizations to help California government officials write model rules for REDD that can create a race-to-the-top for forest protection around the world. We need to show that trailblazing states – like Acre in Brazil and Chiapas in Mexico – are ready to be partners with California and can deliver the rigorous level of enforcement and program implementation that California requires.

The right time

There’s real urgency to linking California’s carbon market with REDD. Even though Brazil, home to the world’s largest tracts of tropical forests, has cut deforestation by about 75% from its 1996-2005 levels and consequently become the world leader in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, that progress is fragile. Over the past year, agribusiness has been pushing back hard against law enforcement and the creation of protected reserves, and deforestation increased nearly 30%. If we want Brazil to continue reducing its deforestation towards zero, we must provide economic incentives to protect the Amazon, and California can be an important catalyst in doing that.

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Derek Walker

Derek Walker

Derek is associate vice president for EDF's U.S. Climate and Energy program.

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Comments

I think that it is absolutely amazing that the practices and programs implemented by our California can make an impact on the carbon footprint and push toward sustainability for other countries!! This possibility and influence is such an encouraging thing.

well, I hope, that as time moves on, today, tomorrow and into the future, we would have learned all we can about how to help the rain forest.

we must take action on many fronts to protect the environment and end the unabated attack on the global ecosystem

Save rainforest!

This is a good time to oppose the xl tar sands pipeline decision which is pending